Sclerodermatomyositis Overlap Syndrome with Bullous Lesion: A Rare Presentation

Meryem Elomari Alaoui *

Department of Dermatology and Venerology, University Hospital Center Ibn SINA, University Mohamed V, Rabat, Morocco.

Amani Fliti

Department of Dermatology and Venerology, University Hospital Center Ibn SINA, University Mohamed V, Rabat, Morocco.

Narjess Er-Rachdy

Department of Dermatology and Venerology, University Hospital Center Ibn SINA, University Mohamed V, Rabat, Morocco.

Mariame Meziane

Department of Dermatology and Venerology, University Hospital Center Ibn SINA, University Mohamed V, Rabat, Morocco.

Nadia Ismaili

Department of Dermatology and Venerology, University Hospital Center Ibn SINA, University Mohamed V, Rabat, Morocco.

Laila Benzekri

Department of Dermatology and Venerology, University Hospital Center Ibn SINA, University Mohamed V, Rabat, Morocco.

Karima Senouci

Department of Dermatology and Venerology, University Hospital Center Ibn SINA, University Mohamed V, Rabat, Morocco.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Overlap syndrome is diagnosed when at least two classical connective tissue diseases are observed in one patient, which develops simultaneously or sequentially.

Sclerodermatomyositis (SDM) is one of the overlapping syndromes, defined by the association of dermatomyositis and scleroderma, which may be localized or systemic.

The American College of Rheumatology European League against Rheumatism (ACR-EULAR) classification criteria are used to establish the diagnosis of systemic sclerosis and dermatomyositis.

Clinically, this syndrome is characterized by the association of myalgia or myositis, arthralgia, with the skin changes of scleroderma, as well as Raynaud's phenomenon, interstitial lung disease, calcinosis, masked facies, dysphagia or esophageal dysmotility4, and immunologically, the presence of specific Pm/Scl antibodies in over 50% of cases.

Rare cases in the literature have described this association, but not in its bullous form, which is why we report here on a patient with bullous sclerodermatomyositis.

Keywords: Sclerodermatomyositis, bullous, overlap syndrome, autoimmune condition


How to Cite

Alaoui, M. E., Fliti, A., Er-Rachdy, N., Meziane, M., Ismaili, N., Benzekri, L., & Senouci, K. (2024). Sclerodermatomyositis Overlap Syndrome with Bullous Lesion: A Rare Presentation. Asian Journal of Research in Dermatological Science, 7(1), 44–49. Retrieved from https://journalajrdes.com/index.php/AJRDES/article/view/106

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