Bacterial Dermo-Hypodermatitis (BDH) in Ziguinchor (Senegal): A 2-Year Review

Boubacar Ahy Diatta *

Dermatology Department, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Senegal.

Mory Gueye

Department of Medicine and Surgery, Assane Seck University of Ziguinchor, Senegal.

Marie Antoinette Daba Dione

Department of Medicine and Surgery, Assane Seck University of Ziguinchor, Senegal.

Pie Nibirantije

Dermatology Department, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Senegal.

Diama Sakho

Department of Medicine and Surgery, Assane Seck University of Ziguinchor, Senegal.

Noël Magloire Manga

Department of Medicine and Surgery, Assane Seck University of Ziguinchor, Senegal.

Ansoumana Diatta

Department of Medicine and Surgery, Assane Seck University of Ziguinchor, Senegal.

Patrice Mendy

Dermatology Department, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Senegal.

Alioune Badara Diouf

Department of Medicine and Surgery, Assane Seck University of Ziguinchor, Senegal.

Niang Suzanne Oumou

Dermatology Department, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Senegal.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Introduction: The incidence of bacterial dermo-hypodermatitis (BDH) varies worldwide. In Africa, a resurgence has been noted in recent years, with the identification of certain local and general risk factors in urban areas. However, the epidemiology of bacterial dermohypodermatitis in other regions of Senegal remains unknown. The aims of our study were to determine the epidemiological, clinical, and therapeutic outcome of bacterial dermo-hypodermatitis, as well as to identify the eventual associated risk factors.

Methodology: We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study of the records of patients followed for BDH in the two Dermatology departments of the Ziguinchor region over a 4-year (01 July 2019 to 01 July 2022).

Results : We collected 148 cases of BDH. The sex ratio was 1.17. The mean age of patients was 55.83 years. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were used in 13 cases (8.8%), with worsening of symptoms in 9.5%. Bacterial dermohypodermatitis was non-necrotizing in 133 cases (89.9%) and necrotizing in 15 (10.1%). There was a point of entry in 92 cases (62.1%). Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid has been used in 124 cases (83.8%). Surgical debridement has been  performed in 12 cases (8.1%). Favorable progression noted in 141 cases (98.6%). General factors associated with BDH were arterial hypertension in 21 cases (14.2%), obesity in 20 cases (13.5%), diabetes in 14 cases (9.5%) and artificial depigmentation in 8 cases (5.4%). Skin Regional risk factors were lymphedema in 14 cases (9.5%), and no deaths were observed.

Conclusion:Bacterial dermo-hypodermatitis is common in Ziguinchor, and predominantly affects adult males, contrary to the predominance of females in the literature. Cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity and arterial hypertension were the most common.

Keywords: Epidemiology, bacterial dermohypodermatitis, ziguinchor


How to Cite

Diatta , B. A., Gueye, M., Dione , M. A. D., Nibirantije , P., Sakho , D., Manga , N. M., Diatta , A., Mendy , P., Diouf , A. B., & Oumou , N. S. (2023). Bacterial Dermo-Hypodermatitis (BDH) in Ziguinchor (Senegal): A 2-Year Review. Asian Journal of Research in Dermatological Science, 6(1), 53–59. Retrieved from https://journalajrdes.com/index.php/AJRDES/article/view/86

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